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Lighting

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Overview

Energy-efficient lighting can create significant savings in energy consumption, household bills and greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards Determinations support the development of energy-efficient lighting products and deliver quality and consistency to consumers.

At a glance

 

Minimum Energy
Performance Standards

Energy
Rating
Label

Australia

New Zealand

Ballasts for fluorescent lamps

Yes

Other*

Determination

Requirements

Compact fluorescent lamps

Yes

Other*

​​​​Determination 

Requirements

Incandescent lamps

Yes
(Australia only)

Other*

Determination

-

Light emitting diodes

No

No

Under consideration

Under consideration

Linear fluorescent lamps

Yes

No

Determination

Requirements

Street and public lighting

Yes
(Voluntary)

No

-

-

Transformers & converters for halogens

Yes

Other*

Determination

-

* While no Energy Rating Label is required, labelling requirements do apply. For more information see the relevant Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards Determination.

Latest news

  • Improving the energy efficiency of light bulbs

    Work is underway to improve energy efficiency Determinations for light bulbs in Australia and New Zealand. Energy Ministers have agreed to:

    • remove any remaining incandescent bulbs and inefficient halogen light bulbs from the market, where an equivalent light emitting diode (LED) light bulb is available
    • introduce minimum standards for LED bulbs, which currently suffer from a large range of product quality.

    New and revised Determinations for light bulbs are currently being finalised.

  • Phase out of mercury in lighting products

    From 7 March 2022, Australia prohibited the import, export and manufacture of some compact fluorescent lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high pressure mercury vapour lamps, and mercury in cold cathode fluorescent lamps and external electrode fluorescent lamps for electronic displays. There are some exemptions.

    This phase-out formed part of Australia’s commitments to reduce mercury pollution under the Minamata Convention on Mercury.

    For more details and information on these changes please see Minamata Convention on Mercury - Sector specific guidance on the Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water’s website.

 

Technical requirements

Incandescent and halogen light bulbs, compact fluorescent bulbs, double-capped fluorescent bulbs, ballasts for fluorescent bulbs, and transformers and electronic step-down converters for extra low voltage bulbs must comply with Minimum Energy Performance Standards.

LED bulbs do not currently have to comply with Minimum Energy Performance Standards and are not required to carry an Energy Rating Label. A consultation process is underway exploring the topic of introducing Minimum Energy Performance Standards for LEDs. Visit the Consultations page for more information about how to get involved.

The specific technical requirements, including standards that are referenced, for lighting products are detailed in the relevant Determinations.

Labelling requirements

There are currently no requirements for lighting products to carry an Energy Rating Label. However, some products must display technical details such as light output in lumens and power in watts. Refer to each product’s Determination for more information about what specific markings must be included on the product packaging.

Useful resources

  • Consumer advice

    The consumer page for Lighting provides information for consumers on how to choose a product to meet their needs and how to use these products efficiently.

  • Training guides

    The E3 Program has developed a few training guides for those working with and selling lighting products.

    • The Basics of Efficient Lighting. This guide introduces the basic concepts of light and lighting, the key requirements of a lighting system and lighting standards. It also explains what is meant by sustainability and energy efficiency and how good lighting design can contribute to these.
    • Specialist lighting retailer training. The specialist lighting retailer training package consists of a retailer guide and suite of residential case studies designed to help retailers support their customers to choose efficient lighting solutions that meet their needs.
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